The Starbucks job application posted on the company’s website on Tuesday is a parody of the company itself.

The job posting is for a “senior vice president,” the description for which reads, “With Starbucks, you can have everything.

You can live the good life, and you can be a great friend to all.

With Starbucks job placement opportunities, your resume is your best friend.”

The job description for Starbucks senior vice-president is not an actual job, the company said in a statement.

Instead, it is a mockup that uses words such as “prestigious,” “top tier,” “best in class” and “outstanding.”

“We do our best to be accurate and fair, and when we do make mistakes, we apologize,” the company wrote.

It is unclear what qualifications are required for the job.

Starbucks said the job application includes a “summary of your qualifications and experience,” but it does not provide any other details.

It’s unclear whether the company will actually hire the candidate, which would be a rare and unusual occurrence in a company known for its “unofficial” hires.

“Starbucks is an American icon,” the statement from Starbucks said.

“We believe that people are inspired to achieve their dreams when they see the company they love in action.

It is important to our business that people around the world, who love our coffee, see a bright future.

Our hiring practices are fair, transparent and respectful.”

Starbursts stock fell nearly 6 per cent in early trading after the announcement, while the stock price has gained more than 3 per cent since its early November lows.

Earlier this month, Starbucks announced it would hire a new chief executive to lead the company through a challenging economic downturn.

In a statement released on Tuesday, CEO Howard Schultz said that “while we are thrilled that our people and culture are returning to where they belong, our commitment to excellence remains.”

“Our focus is on building the world’s largest coffee company with a world-class culture, and our vision for Starbucks remains one of service, passion, and creativity,” he said.

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